Tree Events 2020

Most of our events will be presented as online webinars in Zoom. We will have a few field courses, with strict physical distancing and masking required.

October 31: The Biology of Autumn Field Course

This is an in-person Field Course that requires physical distancing and masks. Class is limited to 15 people.

As we experience the glory of trees and forests in autum, as trees explode into color, we will experience the beauty of Lexington Cemetery and explore the science of autumn colors, leaf fall, and root growth.

When: Saturday, October 31, 10 am – 1 pm. Tickets available now. 

Tickets are free, but registration is required. Click the button below to register. If you have any questions, please contact us.  NOTE:  You will receive a confirmation email  which includes details about the course.

Oak tree in a field

November 4: Invasive Species: Which ones should we worry about?

Invasive species are introduced plants or animals that spread and compete with native species. Most introduced species are not invasive, but a small number are. Invasive plant species are mostly introduced by the worldwide horticulture trade, though some are introduced by government boides such as the Natural Resource Conservation Service. Many species listed as invasive do little harm, but often great effort and expense are devoted to extirpating them. With an emphasis on trees and shrubs, we will discuss why some invasive species are more troublesome than others, and you may be surprised at what we discover in our discussion. There will be ample time for discussion.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Wednesday, November 4, 7-8:30 pm. Tickets available now for $10. NOTE: Registration closes at 5pm on November 4. You will not be able to register after that time.

 

Oak tree in a field

December 2: Climate Change and the Fate of Trees

Rapid climate change is going to radically alter our forests in a very short period of time. Add to that the devastation wrought by the insects and diseases of trees that we introduced, leading to the extinction of American chestnut and the current loss of our ash and hemlock trees. The result is that our forests are increasingly stressed and unhealthy. If we stand idly by, many species will shrink in range and abundance, or become extinct. This webinar will discuss how and why trees migrate, the impacts of the climate crisis, and what we can do to help.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Wednesday, December 2, 7-8:30 pm. Tickets available now for $10. NOTE: Registration closes at 5pm on December 4. You will not be able to register after that time.

Oak tree in a field

Past Events

See Past Events below. Some events will be available as recordings soon.

October 14: The Biology of Autumn

This is a Tree Week 2020 Presentation. For more information about related events, please visit the Tree Week page.

As we experience the glory of trees and forests in autum, as trees explode into color, we take an opportunity to talk about what trees are doing at this time of year. Autumn colors and the fall of leaves is not a passive response of trees to changes in weather. Instead, trees are engaging in a highly active sequence of behaviors that serve to conserve nutrients and prepare trees for the chill of winter. Trees expend considerable energy to move nutrients, especially N, from the leaves into the stems and roots. Fall colors are a physiologic response to this preparation. Below ground, roots are in a period of active growth even as growth in the crown ceases. We will discuss the modern understanding of all the events taking place in trees as they prepare for winter.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Wednesday, October 14, 7-8:30 pm. Tickets available now. NOTE: Registration Closes at 5pm on October 14. You will not be able to register after that time.

This is a Lexington Tree Week event and is free.  Tickets are free, but registration is required. Click the button below to register. If you have any questions, please contact us.  NOTE:  You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom which includes the link for entering the webinar.

Oak tree in a field

September 30: You Can Help Save The American Chestnut

The American chestnut is almost extinct in the wild as a result of a disease, chestnut blight. The cause was a fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, introduced to New York in 1904 on ornamental Japanese chestnuts. Within a few decades, the disease killed about five billion trees in the greatest epidemic in any organism.  Now, we have a chance to restore the American chestnut. Join us to find out about the history of this magnificent tree, its death and decline, and opportunities for its restoration.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Wednesday, September 30, 7-8:30 pm. Tickets available now.

Tickets are $5 per person. Click the button below to register. If you have any questions, please contact us.  NOTE:  You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom which includes the link for entering the webinar.

Oak tree in a field

September 2: Tree Planting: How To Do It Right

Urban forests are in decline in spite of major efforts to plant trees. Part of the decline is due to poor health and poor planting methods for new trees. We will explore better methods of restoring urban forests, including plant selection, planting methods, and ways to improve survival. We will begin with a discussion of the problems with current tree selection, planting, and maintenance and then move on to ideas for improving the health and longevity of planted trees. The emphasis will be on tree planting not only in urban areas but on farms, in yards, and other places. We will use the principles that guide forest tree planting programs. There will be ample opportunities for questions.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Wednesday, September 2, 7-8:30 pm.  (Note Date Change). Tickets available now

Tickets are $5 per person. Click the button below to register. If you have any questions, please contact us.  NOTE:  You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom which includes the link for entering the webinar.

Oak tree in a field

July 28: What Is a Native Tree, Anyway?

People are increasingly interested in native trees. Trees native to a given location are generally expected to grow better and live longer in their native range. The range suitable for a given tree species is not constant, and tree ranges are constantly changing. In the current climate crisis, scientists predict that the current range of many tree species will change very rapidly. In this webinar, we will discuss the history of tree ranges since the last glaciation, what determines the range and extent of a species, and what tree ranges might look like in the future. The presentation will be based on the best science available, but without the use of technical terminology.

This is a Zoom webinar. There will be ample opportunity for participants to post questions.

When: Tuesday July 28 at 6 pm (Note: event was rescheduled from July 22

Tickets are $5 per person. Click the button below to register. If you have any questions, please contact us.  NOTE:  You will receive a confirmation email from Eventbrite which includes your ticket number. Approximately 24 hours before the webinar, we will send another email with detailed instructions for entering the Zoom webinar.

Flowers of Catalpa speciosa